F**k Roadmaps!!! – The good, the bad and the ugly

Welcome to 2019!!!

For our 1st session of the year, we are focusing on the #1 requested topic in our annual survey – roadmaps!

Our speakers will be taking you through their perspective on roadmaps… we won’t give it all away just yet but you will hear that not every roadmap is f**ked, tips on how to unf**k your roadmap, and of course when to tell a roadmap to go f**k itself.

Our speakers will include examples from both personal experience and the way their current organisation navigates their use. Our three great speakers will be:

David Bignell

  • Product Lead at SEEK, currently focused on improving the eCommerce space across the APAC region.
  • Picked up most of my craft from stuffing things up at least once.
  • Current ‘product passion’ would be trying to describe things in verbs and not nouns. Gives an interesting perspective!

Whitney Cali

  • GM Product, Audience & Experience, REA Group
  • As REA Group’s GM – Product, Audience & Experience, Whitney Cali is responsible for creating smart and compelling experiences in realestate.com.au’s desktop & mobile apps to help change the way the world experiences property. She leads a team of product managers, designers and UX researchers to create intuitive and personalised experiences that help individuals make great property decisions.

Keith Swann

  • Lead Product Manager, Origin Energy

There will be lots of time for Q&A and you can submit questions via Sli.do or vote on the questions of others. Details will be shared on the night.

Thanks to our sponsors! Without them these events would not happen!

Thank you to Gather for hosting us. Gather is a brand within United Co. and exists to connect and inspire a community of Melbourne’s bright-minded and open-hearted, exploring complex questions, expanding perspectives and building skills for a thriving future.

Making sure we don’t go hungry or die of thirst..

Brainmates

RSVP now


Every Product is a Service: Service Design and Product Management – June event

Join us for a panel discussion on Service Design & Product Management on June 21st. RSVP

Today’s customers demand more than a good product; they expect a great customer experience. Are we being experience led or product led? How do we come together to deliver both?

Most designers have felt the frustration of working on product led projects. Most product managers have felt the inevitable scope creep of designers. If you’ve felt the pain of the design vs product divide, you’re not alone. It’s time we sit down for a chat (& drinks) to work through…

We already have a waitlist for this event but spaces open up so put yourself on the list. Drinks and nibbles will be provided.

Our panelists:

Kate Edwards-Davis, Product Manager, Karista – a start-up helping people who need care to find their ideal community-based care or disability support service.

She stumbled into a career in IT after studying philosophy and classical music performance. Always a strong advocate for the value of spending time listening to customers, it has helped her teams to deliver imaginative and valuable solutions in many sectors including finance, retail, manufacturing, government and education. She should probably say her greatest joy in life is her two young sons – but in all honesty they probably come second to her obsession with the music of Prince.

Daniel Kinal, Senior Product Manager, MYOB

Daniel has been in product management for over 15 years, chiefly working in IT with a focus on B2B products. He gets excited about helping businesses become more effective in decision-making, more efficient in their processes and more engaging with their customers.
Daniel is at his happiest when waving his arms about in front of a whiteboard with a bunch of smart people, exploring problems and weighing up solutions. He’s passionate about product management as a discipline and is intrigued by how businesses, large and small, grapple with the sometimes-elusive concepts of innovation and collaboration.

Our wonderful Service design line-up:

Dr Stefanie Russo, Principal Designer, NAB
Julia Birks, Lead strategic designer, Isobar.

We will use sli.do for panel questions so start prepping your thoughts on what is the difference between service & product? I’ll add more controversial questions closer to the date 🙂

The event will be hosted by SuperSeed / NEXT – The innovation division of the Reece Group.

Check your bias at the door – May wrap-up

A cognitive bias is a shortcut your brain takes to make decisions. Cognitive biases can impact our decision making, our memory, the way we interpret research and more.

As product managers need to understand our customers & their needs, motivations, problems (etc), it is a ‘mistake’ to let your lazy brain fall prey to the cognitive biases that make you hold onto your own preferences or beliefs, no matter what evidence is presented!

Our speaker was David Di Sipio, a registered Psychologist and currently working at Squiz as a UX Consultant. David creates great experiences by focusing on what makes people tick. His approach is grounded in academic research, big-data and best-practice.

David ran us through some great examples & how to manage the 6 most common biases:

  1. Selection Bias – who are you talking to?
  2. Framing Effect – the words you use & way you present your questions
  3. Confirmation Bias – focusing on the information that reinforces your ideas & ignoring the ones that disprove your idea
  4. Observer Effect – subconsciously influencing someone with your body language
  5. Anchoring Bias – putting too much emphasis on the 1st bit of info we receive
  6. Clustering Illusion – seeing patterns when none exist

After walking thru these biases, David gave us time to talk thru some of the biases we’ve fallen for & there was a bit of conversation regarding which is our favourite bias!

Want more info? You can view David’s slides or read his article on Medium which also contains the links to all the great videos he showed.

Thanks again to Origin for hosting us.

Origin Energy

We’ve announced our June session – RSVP now for a collaboration between Product Anonymous and Service Design Melbourne discussing ‘every product is a service’.

Pitchfest for Lightning Talk slots at Leading the Product Melbourne

Leading the Product (LTP) are planning another round of Lightning Talks this year. Would you like to be one of those speakers & have the chance to present to 500+ product professionals???

We’re hosting a LTP Pitchfest to give you the chance to do exactly that!

First, we’ll hear from the folks who did Lightning Talks last year. Get their tips and hear about their experience in planning, practicing and getting up there!

Then, it’s your turn! Those of you interested will get 90 seconds to pitch what you’d like to talk about. No slides… just you sharing with the crowd & judges.

At the end of the evening, 2 people will be selected to present a Lightning Talk at Leading the Product 2018. Selection is based on the judges’ vote and votes from the audience.

At the Sydney pitchfest, Ivy Horinbrook made it thru the pitches & will be giving a talk at LTP. She said:
When I first read about pitch night, I thought “no way”. 30 pitches, one winner… sounds a little too much like gladiatorial combat. But then I thought, it’s 90 seconds, what do I have to lose? And on the night the crowd was friendly, there was a sense of camaraderie between those pitching, and it was fun to engage the crowd. I still can’t believe I won – I’ll be taking the stage in front of 400 product managers in Sydney in October, that’s a pretty amazing opportunity.

Our judges for the evening:

  • Sarah Mitchell – Product Manager for Leading the Product
  • Adrienne Tan – Co-Founder of Brainmates & Leading the Product
  • Nicole Brolan – Product Director at SEEK
  • Senior Product Leader from Culture Amp soon to be announced.

I WANT TO PRESENT! WHAT DO I NEED TO DO?

You should rsvp for this session and then tell us you’re interested via this form.

WHAT IS A LIGHTNING TALK?

It is a five minute presentation, with 20 slides that advance automatically. You can see the video of the three Lightning talks from Leading the Product Melbourne

Of course don’t forget to get your tickets for the Leading the Product 2018 as it is going to be a fabulous product event!

Thanks to our LTP sponsors Brainmates and Seek for making this event happen.

seek Brainmates

 

 

RSVP now and help us pick the line-up for LTP

What does a product manager “manager” look like? – June event

This month we are having a cozy fireside chat with product leaders to discuss managing product managers.

They hire, they fire and they look after the product portfolio as well as the product managers. We will talk about what it takes to manage product managers, guide them to greatness and inspire them in their roles.

However, product managers are people managers too – so we will talk a little bit about what skills you need to enhance and work on to do this well. Most importantly you get to ask the questions!

RSVP

Our speakers, mentors and advisers are:

Fiona Moreton – Head of Product Strategy at PageUp People.

Fiona has worked on many sides of the product before joining the product management league and then heading up the team. Considering PageUp People’s products are focused on the HR customer (recruitment, seccession, etc), she has talked with heaps of corporate recruiters over the years. She has also managed other teams – including sales – so she’ll much insight into the people side of this ‘manager’ part of the product title.

Layla Foord is a builder of businesses, saver of lost dogs and sometime singer. She has learned her craft over the last 23 years here in Australia and in the UK. She specialises in finding connections and building amazing teams who make awesome things. Managing Director of Touchtech Labs she is building a new business delivering web and mobile product solutions for entrepreneurs and enterprises.

As GM at Envato, Layla recently launched Envato Studio a $6m+ global freelance platform. She has developed strategies and digital products for Yellow Pages and launched Whereis Navigator one of the first Mobile GPS apps. In London she held the role of Product Development Director at Nielsen with responsibilities across Europe and led an EU funded project to discover new technologies which involved educational institutions in four countries pushing the boundaries of auto-detection image technology.

Layla is also on the board of 100 Story Building (http://www.100storybuilding.org.au/), an amazing social enterprise in Melbourne’s inner west helping to improve the literacy of young people in the area.

Since 1997, PageUp has helped employers worldwide attract, hire, develop, retain, and improve employee performance. Our Unified Talent Management platform, along with our talent management consulting services, help you optimize your multinational workforce strategy across the whole business, maximize business impact with a balance between global efficiency and local responsiveness, and continuously improve the return on your human capital investment.

RSVP

PageUp_LOGO_CMYK

When your product is newly wild in the world – May event

What happens when your darling little product baby is ready for launch and support. Be it MVP or mature product, you’re letting it loose on the world and need to know how to handle what happens next.

Our speakers will discuss what happens in that launch and support timeframe plus we’ll have Q&A:

  • When is your product ready-or when are we ready to let go (ie transition from active delivery to support)
  • Handing over to a support team vs doing it ourselves
  • Looking after your customer. Or working out when / if they should just build their own team, and how.
  • Sticking to the plan (fixes, customer feedback, curveballs)
  • Sticking to the hours (work/life)
  • What if the product comes back for more? What if it doesn’t?
  • Where we failed. What we learnt.
  • Current challenges
  • Case studies: product support (4 very different models: what went well and what didn’t).

FYI, we’re not covering launch details, marketing, or metrics.

Our speakers:

Suni Stolic has over 10 years experience in delivering multiple products in web and mobile, in both Melbourne and London. While her role names changed at a speed of light, she found that the work itself changed much less. Always caring deeply about the products she worked on, passionate about understanding her users, she enjoys planning in an iterative, goal focused manner. She is great at building rapport with business teams and delivery teams, and believes in collaboration, transparency and open communication.

Suni is a product manager at Cogent and will talk through a couple of recent client experiences, from tailor made support arrangements, to the ups and downs of how things actually unfold.

Our sponsors:

The Cogent team deliver remarkable software to meet business goals, budget and timeframes of their clients. They sometimes build products for large organisations (particularly in Health and Education), other times they work with start-ups, or consult and add capabilities to existing teams. Often these client engagements are long term relationships, but sometimes they come in bursts. Most of the time they provide support to these products after delivery has finished up.

teamsquare Thanks to Teamsquare for hosting!

Teamsquare provides beautiful and collaborative workspace for Melbourne’s leading creators – freelancers, startups, designers, builders and doers. They provide amazing amenities, rock solid technology infrastructure, a strong community, regular events and a raft of services to help their members get on with what they do best. Their more than just a workplace – their a community of like minded creators.

We have a combination of open-plan workstations and private offices. Flexible month-by-month subscriptions with no lock in. Free for anybody to try for a day via http://try.teamsquare.co/

API Product Management with Elena Kelareva – Wrap-up March 2016

Our event this month had the wonderful Elena Kelareva, Product Manager at Google, talk with us about API product management and product management at Google. Elena is currently the product manager for the web maps APIs – and there is a lot to that group of API’s!

Having an API can aid your company in a number of ways. It can:

  • Allow you to build usage
  • Be a revenue model (which the maps API is)
  • Allow for the extension of ideas beyond what you may first imagine with the core product

People can use API services to serve a niche market that otherwise wouldn’t be possible. For example, birdwatchers can use the Maps API to build out sites that Google wouldn’t directly build.

API Product Management

Elena had three main points when thinking about managing your API. She provided some call-outs to consider before embarking on building an API and ensuring your intention is known before you get started.

When thinking about managing an API vs a 1st party product, Elena’s 3 main points are:

  1. You have an extra stakeholder to work with! Instead of just company and end users, you now have developers as a key party to consider.
  2. API’s are harder to change
  3. Management of the applications of the API

Developers as a stakeholder

Developers are critical to the success of your API. They can extend your product in ways you will never think of and will add features to their product that only your API makes possible.

Ensure you API strategy is aligned with the needs of the developers – be clear about the core user base and their business strategy including your SOAs.

APIs are really hard to change

Changing an API is like trying to redirect the Titanic! Elena shared some war stories to illustrate why.

Because entire businesses have built their sites on the Google map API, changes become hard as the API is so integral to these sites. When the Maps API was ready to update to v3, they gave sites 3 years to transition to the new API. As the deadline approached, they realised many users had not done the work so they extended the deadline by 6 months. Still, people didn’t switch so they started reaching out to individual sites to see how essential the API was – could they just turn off v2? Turns out people could actually die if v2 didn’t function which lead to Google building a ‘shim’ to do the translation from v2 to v3.

Elena also talked about when Google decided to charge for the use of the API. This happened in the early days, before Elena was PM, but the ramifications of such a switch in strategy is something she is very much aware of. Even though the charging model only impacted the top 1% of users (big sites/organisations who had large usage, as the model was based on usage). Certainly the perception was a painful lesson for any product manager to be more considerate of what your long term goal might be for a revenue model and tread carefully when starting out “free”.

Getting ready for my first @product_anon #product_anon with #elenaKelareva from #google

A photo posted by Rita Arrigo (@ritaarrigo) on

Pros and cons of the possible applications of your API

Day in & day out, Elena is inspired by the different ways the APIs are used. This is a fabulous aspect of being an API product manager & thinks that inspiration is one of the best perks of looking after APIs. There are so many developers out there looking to try great new things in creative ways and using these tools to save time.

Some of her favourite examples are disaster related initiatives such as those created during Black Saturday and flood maps that highlight the impact of global warming. These helped show people where the emergency was happening and helped people let families know they were in safe places. Another local example was infoxchange which is helping homeless people find services.

The downside to creativity and innovation is those who use the tools for not such great applications. Keeping an on the inadvertent as well as the deliberate misuse requires constant monitoring. The careful drafting of terms is an important part of the role to ensure you have something to fall back on to block those users or manage their actions to prevent harm to the rest of the community of users + your company.

Thanks to Elena for sharing some very practical tips to a highly technical product service!

What’s it like to work at Google as a PM?

The moment we had all been waiting for – what’s it really like to work at Google?

Outside of the more obvious perks that are talked about, the hiring process includes hiring for niceness. Building a great culture is often talked about across the blogosphere but such a simple rule is so much easier to follow.

Elena talked about how great it was, having interacted with so many people, that she had yet to run into anyone not nice to work with. The company also supports this continued application by encouraging or allowing staff to award a colleague with a bonus of $500 when they do something above and beyond for another colleague. That helps create a culture where people are very willing to help each other out. The behavior is also encouraged through performance evaluation, which is less aligned to product success metrics and instead tied to 360 feedback and collaboration with colleagues.   

The other insight was about how much room a product manager at Google has to shape their role and product rather than receiving much top down directive. Elena was mildly surprised when she started at Google (her first PM role) that she was given 3 page document to start work. The document was mostly a list of names of who she should talk to instead of a list of ‘things to do’.

In some ways, this is so obvious that I am surprised more of us don’t just state that as the approach. A key part of being a PM is to listen and understand how things tie together and who does what. Only once you have understood that space can you possibly form and contribute opinions in to what to do next. That fact that Google openly acknowledges this, sends their PM’s off to do that and gives them time to get to that stage without dictating is fabulous. However, as a PM on her first day on the job, Elena did find it a little intimidating!

Thanks again to Envato for hosting us this St Pat’s day and please join us for our next events. We have two for April – a special event with Jim Kalbach on Mapping Experiences and our main event for the month is all about the wonderful topic of Roadmaps: friend or enemy!?!

 

April session: Roadmaps – friend or enemy?

Are roadmaps your frenemy? There’s so much to love – and hate – about them! Let us count the ways… multiple versions for different audiences, excel/ppt, constant changes, reminding people where we are headed (& no, not that special feature for that 1 client…).

Our panelists will discuss:

  • Adam Fry – Why roadmaps are good! And why it’s bad for the product manager when the roadmap goes bad! (i.e. problems with top down directions of roadmap building)
  • Chris Duncan – How to collaboratively build your roadmap and some tools for making your roadmaps look great
  • Matt Kirkey – Why roadmaps are a terrible crux in a product managers life! You should tear them up and throw them away! (in his favourite devil’s advocate role!)

And then it’s over to attendees! We’ll divide you into groups where you’ll be creating your own roadmap.

RSVP now! for Thursday April 14th 6pm for a 6:30pm start

Our Panelists:

Adam Fry – Lead Product Manager – Sportsbet

Adam is a seasoned product management professional, having delivered and managed a variety of products and services, spanning a range of market verticals and industry sectors. He is currently Lead Product Manager at Sportsbet where he has successfully launched a number of high profile products into a highly competitive marketplace.
Prior to Sportsbet Adam led portfolios at organisations including Telstra, iiNet and VicTrack, building compelling customer value propositions, developing clear product roadmaps, implementing structured go-to-market frameworks, and managing the end to end product lifecycle.

Chris Duncan – Product Manager – carsales.com Ltd.

Chris Duncan is a passionate and pragmatic product manger, having a professional background spanning both technical and analytical roles. Over the last six years working with carsales, Chris has lead a raft of successful, high-profile products and services for which he prides himself on delivering true customer value.   Having managed initiatives right across the development lifecycle, Chris’ strength and passion is for developing solid, well communicated product strategies and roadmaps. Never shying away from a good debate, Chris is always keen to discuss all things product management.

Matthew Kirkey – Product Manager – Technology Platforms for Learning Seat

I manage 10 products across 4 streams that roughly 550 clients and 600,000 active users use. The products are in the online learning and compliance space.

I’m Canadian and my education was Computer Science, however I’m more comfortable sitting on the business/strategic side where I leverage my tech background.  I’ve worked for a large Telco in Vancouver, a start up in Georgia, Starbucks as a barista in Uni and run a consulting company for small businesses in a couple cities across Ontario.  I’ve covered business intelligence, IT project management, business analysis, process engineering and somehow managed to setup a renegade data warehouse in a telephone exchange building somewhere in outer Calgary.

For fun, I run a curated weekly event newsletter, a semi-regular pub crawl and am writing a book about craft beer (ideas and suggestions welcome).

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Mapping Experiences with Jim Kalbach – Special Event!

Jim Kalbach, author of Mapping Experiences is in town for a couple workshops on experience mapping and UX strategy.
Mapping Experiences

With the help of Aconex and UX Design Group of Melbourne, we are lucky enough to have Jim for a special Product Anon on Thursday April 7th. Jim will be talking about mapping experiences and how to create value using customer journeys, blueprints & diagrams.

RSVP now!

To attend Jim Kalbach’s workshops:

• The Mapping experiences workshop is on the 9th of April.  Details & Tickets.

• On the 11th of April, Jim will focus on UX strategy. Grab your tickets now.

February wrap: using Google design sprints for innovation

Seek’s Rob Scherer (Lead UX, Hirer products) and Rob Alford (Product manager, New products) came to talk to us about their use of Google Venture design sprints.

They were looking to come up with a completely new product idea and wanted to challenge themselves & the organisation. The guys did a great job of explaining the process without telling us what the market or product is – they are currently building the product & we can look forward to a very exciting launch I am sure.

Before jumping into the design sprint, they worked with the person who would facilitate the session and tweaked the Google process to suit them. One of the main reasons for trying this approach was to ensure coverage from multiple functions of the business with an approach that forces (encourages!) collaboration and allows everyone to contribute. People from various departments are locked in a room for a week and aren’t allowed to leave…. (well, maybe not that strict! 🙂 )

As Google describes it: “We shortcut the usual endless-debate cycle and compress months of time into a single week. Instead of waiting to launch a minimal product to understand if an idea is any good, teams get great data from a prototype. The sprint gives these companies a superpower. The ability to build and test nearly any idea in just 40 hours.

 

So what did Seek do differently to the Google approach:

Seek wanted to use the sprint methodology but were keen to make a few modifications to incorporate their own experiences to the process.

The Team

Google recommends 4-8 people for design sprint. Seek set up a bigger team of 12 people which allowed them to have a broad representation of the areas (development, marketing, strategy, BA, etc) needed to explore this space. While a senior person was in the room on the first day to help set the stage… that’s the only day! Having no senior team members helped do away with group think as no one was waiting for the senior person in the room to comment. They broke the 12 down into smaller groups of 3 for the sketching.

Time & Steps

The Google approach, takes a team of 4-8 people and spend one day for each of these steps:

Unpack -> Sketch -> Decide -> Prototype -> Test.

They also decided to add a few more steps to bring it to 7 days:

Unpack -> Build Empathy -> Sketch + test -> Sketch + test -> Decide -> Prototype -> Test.

Seek added ‘Build Empathy’ as a request from the UX team. The product guys weren’t so sure it would be useful, they were a little skeptical before doing it, but after trying it they were converted. With such a large group consisting of some people who were new to this type of work, having a day spent on empathy helped to ensure everyone’s mindset was in the right place for thinking about the customer. Seek also added more time to the Sketching section. They wanted to be able to sketch in the morning and then test those ideas in front of customers that afternoon. By doing this 2 days in a row, they had a lot of items validated before getting into the Decision day and presenting to the execs. They feel having the extra time to sketch/test worked really well for them.

Pre-planning & getting outside help

Before the design sprint even started they did a few things to help organise:

  • Booked a dedicated space where they could keep the entire week’s sketches on the wall. They ended up having so much they took over the wall outside the meeting room. Seeing all the work they created over the week was very motivating to the team.
  • Booked the people they’d be showing their sketches too (assisted by their usual research folks)
  • Booked the meeting where they’d present to stakeholders
  • Organised an external facilitator
  • Organised homework for the team (see below for details)

 

What is involved in doing the design sprint?

There is a tonne to do to get ready for the sprint and if you look over the resources you will see that these are just a couple of tips to be aware of where to put emphasis and not skip!

  1. Homework – Before the design sprint started, each member of team had to do their homework. Each person was given a competitor to research and everyone was asked to think about something that inspired them. At the start of the sprint they needed to talk for 2 minutes on each piece of their homework. NO POWERPOINT! The competitor research was kept intentionally light.. what they liked, disliked, etc. Just insight, observation and sharing with everyone else. This was a great technique for divide and conquer. The inspiration step was also a great tool for encouraging people to remain open-minded and positive about what they could do, instead of possibly limiting themselves to iterating only on what was out there already.
  2. Learn to draw exercise – this was an amazing insight from the evening. Everyone was “taught” how to draw including the UX’ers. What this actually meant was that everyone was shown how to draw in a consistent manner so that ideas could be judged equally, not on the skill of the sketcher. Vedran has written up the details on Medium but bascially: use a thin liner pen to draw the outline then a sharpie to accentuate any aspects, a yellow highlighter to draw attention and one grey pen to indicate background/what to ignore. From here, when ideas from different people were combined, the customer could not tell the difference between the sketches and much time was saved by not having to redraw.
  3. Everyone facilitates – to ensure inclusion everyone had a go at facilitating as unseasoned researchers will tend to present more than facilitate but for best results, this should be seen as facilitating user research rather than presenting designs to users.
  4. Everyone takes notes – the intensity of the time-boxing might assume everyone pays attention but everyone was asked to take notes to avoid drifting off, but to ensure people remained engaged. It also helped with adding insights as people took things down and then had to repeat back what they had heard.
  5. Guerilla testing – go to users unannounced and then try out your idea and you will get some very different responses. Rob & Rob noted the big difference in commentary you’ll receive between bringing customers into your office vs going to their environment where they feel comfortable. You’ll get more critical & real feedback when you are in their environment (plus they want to help you solve the problem & will give you ideas).

Key ingredients to success

  1. Having time constraints – This was the most important factor for them & the faciliator was great in moving them along. Enforcing the time constraints meant they stayed focused, had something to show customers and were ready to present to the execs.
  2. Right people – this means the right representation from the organisation for the area you looking to be innovative in but also avoiding any senior execs that might inadvertently provide bias too early.
  3. Keep it visual – have everything on the wall where all can see it, communicate with images, drawing instead of talking.
  4. Use an external facilitator – keeps things neutral, allows the entire team to contribute to the process instead of worrying about the process, can tell people to shut up and get working, which again might be a bit hard for one of the team.

Results (& Would they do it again?)

Yes, Seek have tried the methodology again since they got such a great result the 1st time. The team got a business case up in just a few weeks after the sprint, and the approval process was smoother due to the excitement the sprint had created. The team have been building the product since.

Rob A wasn’t convinced you could use it for every project, partly because it remains hard to convince an organisation to give up people for a week and partly because not every product needs such a methodology. On the other hand, participants of the sprint have gone on to use it in their area as they got so much out it. Aspects of the sessions have also been cherry-picked out as proving to be really helpful tools – such as the drawing component and have been applied in isolation.

It was great to get to hear from an organisation that has used the methodology with such success but also shared with honesty the tough aspects of running it. The intensity is clearly not for the faint-hearted and may well be a stronger reason for not re-using more frequently. As the team that were involved in the sprint went back to their day jobs or moved on to build the prototype into product their focus has also shifted for now. However, any company looking to break themselves out of their norms and product innovation from within should consider using this approach.

Further Resources:

  • The presentation
  • Google Design Sprint prep in detail
  • Vedran’s article on drawing the same way + his perspective on the experience
  • Thanks again to ThoughtWorks for hosting + pizza & to Moondog Brewing for providing such tasty beverages.

    RSVP for the next session in March as we talk more Google topics (API product management & being a product manager at Google)!